7 Things to Consider Before Adopting a Child

Well over 100,000 children are adopted in the United States each year. The adoption process allows many of these children access to a loving and stable home they may otherwise not have had access to. However, there are a number of things you should keep in mind if you are one of the many people considering the adoption of a child.

The Child Comes First

The child is oftentimes the only person of the many who is involved with the adoption to not have much say in the matter. For this reason, it is important for you to remember it is the best interest of the child that is the most important. This could mean the child you want to adopt may not become part of your family or the adoption may not look in the end as you imagined it when the process began. However, it is the child whose needs are most important.

Adoption is not a Small Matter

You should take your time to carefully consider how adoption will affect the lives of you and the rest of your family before moving forward with the plan. You will need to be honest regarding questions like why you really want to add an adopted child to your family, will the adoption negatively affect another aspect of your family, and are you able to support a new child financially and emotionally.

Traditional Households not Needed

Many people will be glad to know that there is much more leeway regarding who is eligible to adopt a child than there was just 20 years ago. Today, single individuals, people over the age of 55 years old, and same-sex couples have all adopted children.

Not always expensive

Some would-be adopted parents believe that adopting a child will cost them money in the five figures. The truth is, you can adopt a child out of the foster care system many times at no cost and in some cases receive a monthly stipend to care for the child.

You are not a savior

You should never forget the difference between adopting a child and being a savior. You should not make the child feel they owe you for ‘saving them.’ Conversely, your adopted child should grow up understanding how much fuller your life is because of him or her.

Patience is Key

The adoption process is filled with stress and red tape. Nothing that is controlled by heavy bureaucracy ever goes smoothly and adoptions are no exception to this rule. Patience is key, as well as, the ear of someone who can talk you down from the ledge when needed.

Resources are Available

Adopted children often come from backgrounds where they have experienced trauma. There are resources available for both the adopted child and parents to deal with the problems that exist.

More people are turning to adoption to add children to their families. If you are considering adopting a child, you should make sure you review the seven considerations above.