The Best Questions to ask Before Buying Reloading Brass

Reloading your own ammunition is a great way to save money on your trips to the range. Plenty of people do it so often that their own recycled brass is insufficient, which has led to a thriving market for reloading brass. Buying brass is a great way to replenish your supply, but there are a few things that you should ask yourself and your supplier before you make a purchase.

How Cost Effective Is It?

While plenty of people reload their ammunition as a hobby, most people get started with it to save money. Reloading is almost always cheaper than buying new ammunition, but there are occasional exceptions. These exceptions most often occur when there is a glut of ammunition on the market, so they are very rare, but you should do some comparison shopping before you buy.

Fortunately, this is fairly easy. Add up the price of the brass and all of the other components for reloading and compare it to the price of each round from your normal supplier. On the rare occasions that reloading is not the cheaper option, ask yourself if you enjoy doing it enough to justify paying a little extra. If you’re reloading because you can’t buy ammunition that meets your needs, then you should skip this step.

How Big Is Your Supply?

Ammunition shortages are surprisingly common, and they can motivate people to start reloading in order to conserve their supply. That’s reasonable, and it can save a huge amount of money and aggravation in the long run, but people often overestimate the scale of shortages. Manufacturers usually increase production in response to stores running out of ammunition, so they usually don’t last very long. If you have enough ammunition to last for a few months, it might be a good idea to wait to see if the supply and price will recover before you invest in brass. If your supply is coming up short, then you shouldn’t hesitate to deal with the problem by reloading.

Is It Used?

Some, but not all, reloading brass is used. That is almost always fine, since brass can be used many times before it starts to degrade, but not all used brass is created equal. The more times that it has been used, the fewer times you can reload it before it starts to lose quality.

The vast majority of used brass with only have been used once before it is sold. A great deal of this once-fired brass comes from police, since many suppliers will give police officers new ammunition in return for empty brass. That means that you can expect high quality from it, so once-fired ammunition is perfect for most reloading enthusiasts. You should only be concerned if the brass has been used many times before you receive it. That having been said, it’s always a good idea to check the brass for defects before reloading. When it comes to guns, it’s always best to play it safe.